The dizzying weight of art

“Art is the only way to run away without leaving home.” ― Twyla Tharp

It was a cool, slightly greying afternoon. Yellowing leaves from the ageing Jacarandas dropped in our hair as bird song and wind filled our ears.  High on the hill, overlooking the city, my friend and I, the only visitors, descended the scaffold stairs into the brick architectural space of a former water storage unit and the weight of the day vanished.

The historic Spring Hill reservoir has been transformed again.  I wrote previously about this public space hosting the Underground Opera and the transcendent experience sound, in the gothic space, has on a listener.  I returned this week to be mesmerised by light.

Open mouthed we stared from on high at the magic woven beneath us. Arriving on solid ground we felt like kids in a mirror maze, removed from the world above.  Daylight from the door overhead  and a small table lamp provided enough light by which to tentatively navigate our way.  At first, without the path lit to discern our course, we gingerly inched along feeling as though we might come to a mirrored dead-end.  Becoming marginally more emboldened we picked our way through the suspended electroluminescent wire framing, that mimicked the shapes of the architecture, and felt a renewed sense of arrival in each segment of the space.

I could not explain how I felt at the time.  Several days hence the best way to describe it is —dislocated.  I felt dislocated and disoriented.  I felt not quite myself.  There was a sense of it at the edges of my consciousness that only now I can liken to  Alice swirling down the rabbit hole.

This free installation continues until the September 23rd and is well worth the visit. I have since discovered the Brisbane City Council has commissioned three artists to present another installation in the Reservoirs that will use sound, film and kinetic sculpture. No doubt, they too will cause visitors to reposition themselves in a familiar historical space.

Brisbane artist, Meagan Streader’s work is exhibited nationally and internationally. It  reflects the minimalist art of the Light and Space movement and reveals the pervasive role of light in governing physical and social navigations of fabricated spaces. Pushing the limits of light within sculpture and installation, she manipulates, reinterprets and extends upon the boundaries of constructed spaces. Through site-specific interventions, her multidimensional use of light re-orientates the viewer’s relationship to the existing architecture and scale of space.

 

5 thoughts on “The dizzying weight of art

  1. Alice in the rabbit hole seems like a perfect description. I feel rather disoriented just looking at the photos! Brilliant installation and I love the free admission making it accessible to all.

  2. Your description of that most unusual event has me queuing up to get in , only to turn around at the entrance , because I’m claustrophobic and going down Alice ‘s rabbit hole freaks me out 😩😖 but wow ! Can I see the appeal if you don’t have that fear .
    Cherryx

    • Cherry I totally understand your reaction. When I first went into that space for the opera I checked my thinking . Part of me thought I was crazy going down underground. Ever since the earthquake in Nepal I hesitate going into high rises, crowded auditoriums, anywhere I can’t escape from quickly.
      The space is large and so doesn’t feel claustrophobic but it is dark and it has a lingering dank smell that could make some uncomfortable.
      How about you and I stay above ground and in open places? 😊. Meet you at the corner in five?

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